Michael Northrop is the program director for the Sustainable Development grantmaking program at the Rockefeller Brothers Fund where he focuses on climate change and energy. Northrop has been a lecturer at Yale University’s Forestry and Environmental Studies School for the last 14 years, where he has taught a course on environmental policy campaigns. Previously he was executive director of Ashoka, an international development organization that supports “public sector entrepreneurs” and an analyst at First Boston, an investment bank in New York City. Northrop serves on New York City’s Sustainability Advisory Board, on the city’s Waterfront Advisory Board, and on the boards of the Rainforest Action Network, Inside Climate News, and Princeton-in-Asia. Northrop has a Master of Public Administration from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton, where he was an English major as an undergraduate.

News and updates

Michael Northrop: Is the Post-Fossil Fuel Era Now Inevitable?

The Fund’s Sustainable Development program director reflects on the atmosphere of the UN climate conference in Paris and highlights 80 agreements and achievements which contributed to the landmark meeting.

Finding New York City's Path to 80 Percent Carbon Reductions by 2050

As part of an ambitious plan to reduce the city’s carbon footprint by 80 percent by 2050, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio formally requested the energy sector to help identify solutions to power the city government’s operations using renewable energy. RBF grantee Architecture 2030 has published a report, Achieving 80x50 , which recommends that New York City update its building code to meet high-performance standards on efficiency and integration of renewables.

Forging a Climate Agreement May Have Just Gotten Easier

The International Union of Architects unanimously adopted and committed to a plan to phase out all fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from the buildings industry by 2050. Michael Northrop, director of the Sustainable Development program at the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, writes that the declaration is a significant step toward reaching a universal, legal climate agreement in 2015.